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Posts Tagged ‘lessons’

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For almost forty years (1961 – 1998) ABC’s Wide World of Sports held a special place in sports broadcasting.  Who could forget those iconic words “The Thrill of Victory and the Agony of Defeat” coupled with clips of spectacular sports feats and unbelievable calamities.  My favorite was the ski jumper that crashed as he got to the bottom of the 90-meter jump flying off into the crowd; truly the agony of defeat.

As the years have passed by, I am amused by the change in perspective of losing.  Back then, the thought of losing was a great motivator not only in sports but in life in general.  Losing made you feel bad; and it made you want to work harder to win the next time.  I can still remember the time I didn’t make a little league baseball team when all my friends did; I wasn’t good enough.  What a motivator; it was the last time I didn’t make a team.  At the end of the season, there were no “participation” ribbons and plaques.  In fact, there were very few trophies in youth sports.  When the season was over, everyone knew how they did; that’s it.

We have gotten to a point where, in society, losing is not a big deal.  So what?  I lost!  No shame, no regret, no big deal, no disappointment.  A great business example is filing bankruptcy.  Bankruptcy use to carry a bad stigma, now it is just another option in an array of possible actions.

I worry about the standards we are setting for our children when we don’t expose them to the setbacks resulting from failure.  Setbacks they can learn from, setbacks that become the impetus for growing into something better.  Failure should hurt.  Failure should make you feel bad.  The feeling of coming up short should be a building block for improvement.  It should not be masked over with a feel-good participation trophy, a ‘get out of jail free’ card, or societal cuddling.  I worry about young people entering the workforce not knowing the pain of failure; i.e., the agony of defeat.

Some of the strongest people I know experienced great failures in their lives, overcame insurmountable odds, and became incredibly powerful people.  When you ask them about their success, somewhere early in the conversation they talk about their setbacks and how they had to fight their way out of a dark place. – No excuses.

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